Life-threatening germ poses threat across medical facilities

 

CDC highlights steps to prevent spread of deadly C. difficile bacteria, which impacts patients in nursing homes and outpatient care, not just hospitals

 

Atlanta, GA, USA (March 6, 2012) – Infections from Clostridium difficile (C. difficile), a bacteria that causes diarrhea and other health issues, is a patient safety concern in all types of medical facilities, not just hospitals as traditionally thought, according to a new Vital Signs report today from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.  While many health care-associated infections, such as bloodstream infections, declined in the past decade, C. difficile infection rates and deaths climbed to historic highs.

 

“C. difficile harms patients just about everywhere medical care is given,” said CDC Director Thomas R. Frieden, M.D., M.P.H.  “Illness and death linked to this deadly disease do not have to happen. Patient lives can be saved when health care providers follow the 6 Steps to Prevention, which include key infection control and smart antibiotic prescribing recommendations.”

 

C. difficile is linked to about 14,000 U.S. deaths every year. Those most at risk are people who take antibiotics and also receive care in any medical setting. Almost half of infections occur in people younger than 65, but more than 90 percent of deaths occur in people 65 and older. Previously released estimates based on billing data show that the number of U.S. hospital stays related to C. difficile remains at historically high levels of about 337,000 annually, adding at least $1 billion in extra costs to the health care system. However, the Vital Signs report shows that these hospital estimates may only represent one part of C. difficile’s overall impact.

According to Vital Signs, 94 percent of C. difficile infections are related to medical care. About 25 percent of C. difficile infections first show symptoms in hospital patients; 75 percent first show in nursing home patients or in people recently cared for in doctor’s offices and clinics.  

 

Although the proportion of infection onset is lower in hospitals, these facilities remain at the core of prevention since many patients with C. difficile infections are transferred to hospitals for care, raising risk of spread within the facility.  The Vital Signs report shows that half of C. difficile infections diagnosed at hospitals were already present at the time the patient was admitted (present on admission), usually after getting care in other facilities. The other half were related to care given in the hospital where the infection was diagnosed.

 

The report highlights three programs showing early success in reducing C. difficile infection rates in hospitals.  Seventy-one hospitals in Illinois, Massachusetts, and New York decreased C. difficile infections by 20 percent in less than two years by following infection control recommendations.  These promising results follow similar efforts in England, a nation that dropped C. difficile infections by more than 50 percent during a recent three-year period. 

 

“C. difficile infections are usually a regional problem since patients transfer back and forth between facilities, allowing the disease to spread,” said L. Clifford McDonald, M.D., CDC medical epidemiologist and lead author of the study. “Health departments have the ability to work with many types of health care facilities, and have a unique opportunity to coordinate local, comprehensive prevention programs to reduce the occurrence of these infections.”

 

Patients get C. difficile infections most often within a few months of taking antibiotics and also receiving medical care. Antibiotics are lifesaving medicines that stop infections, but they also destroy the body’s good bacteria for several months.  During this time, patients can get sick from C. difficile picked up from contaminated surfaces or spread from a health care provider’s hands. Infection risk generally increases with age; children are at lower risk for C. difficile infection. Identifying C. difficile infection early and stopping its spread to other people can save lives. 

 

 

Patients can help stop C. difficile by:

 

  • Taking antibiotics only as prescribed by your doctor. Antibiotics can be lifesaving medicines. 
  • Telling your doctor if you have been on antibiotics and get diarrhea within a few months.
  • Washing your hands after using the bathroom.
  • Trying to use a separate bathroom if you have diarrhea, or being sure the bathroom is cleaned well if someone with diarrhea has used it.

 

CDC Vital Signs is a report that appears on the first Tuesday of the month as part of the CDC journal Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR). Vital Signs is designed to provide the latest data and information on key health indicators – cancer prevention, obesity, tobacco use, alcohol use, prescription drug overdose, HIV/AIDS, motor vehicle passenger safety, health care–associated infections, cardiovascular health, teen pregnancy, access to health care, and food safety.

 

For more information about preventing C. difficile, visit http://www.cdc.gov/HAI/organisms/cdiff/Cdiff_infect.html

Information about tracking HAIs infections can be found at www.cdc.gov/nhsn and at http://www.cdc.gov/hai/eip/index.html

 

 

For Clinicians: 6 Steps to Prevention 

  1. Prescribe and use antibiotics carefully. About 50 % of all antibiotics given are not needed, unnecessarily raising the risk of C. difficile infections.
  2. Test for C. difficile when patients have diarrhea while on antibiotics or within several months of taking them.
  3. Isolate patients with C. difficile immediately.
  4. Wear gloves and gowns when treating patients with C. difficile, even during short visits. Hand sanitizer does not kill C. difficile, and hand washing may not be sufficient.
  5. Clean room surfaces with bleach or another EPA-approved, spore-killing disinfectant after a patient with C. difficile has been treated there.
  6. When a patient transfers, notify the new facility if the patient has a C. difficile infection.

Source: CDC, 2012

 

 

—-

 

 

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

 

CDC works 24/7 saving lives, protecting people from health threats, and saving money through prevention. Whether these threats are global or domestic, chronic or acute, curable or preventable, natural disaster or deliberate attack, CDC is the nation’s health protection agency.

 


 

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 06.03.2012 (tB).

MEDICAL NEWS

Fitness watches generate useful information, but increase patient anxiety
A new device provides added protection against COVID-19 during endoscopic…
81 million Americans lacking space or bathrooms to follow COVID…
Front-line physicians stressed and anxious at work and home
EULAR: High-Dose Glucocorticoids and IL-6 Receptor inhibition can reduce COVID-19…

SCHMERZ PAINCARE

Morbus Fabry mittels Datenanalysen aus dem PraxisRegister Schmerz aufspüren
Neandertaler besaßen niedrigere Schmerzschwelle
Deutscher Schmerz- und Palliativtag 2020 – ONLINE
Deutsche Gesellschaft für Schmerzmedizin fordert Anerkennung von Nicht-Psychologen in der…
DBfK: Besondere Rolle für Pflegeexpert/innen Schmerz – nicht nur in…

DIABETES

“Körperstolz”: Michael Krauser managt seinen Diabetes digital
Der richtige Sensor – von Anfang an
Diabetes mellitus: Ein Risikofaktor für frühe Darmkrebserkrankungen
Fastenmonat Ramadan: Alte und neue Herausforderung für chronisch Erkrankte während…
Sanofi setzt sich für die Bedürfnisse von Menschen mit Diabetes…

ERNÄHRUNG

Corona-Erkrankung: Fehl- und Mangelernährung sind unterschätze Risikofaktoren
Gesundheitliche Auswirkungen des Salzkonsums bleiben unklar: Weder der Nutzen noch…
Fast Food, Bio-Lebensmittel, Energydrinks: neue Daten zum Ernährungsverhalten in Deutschland
Neue Daten zur Ernährungssituation in deutschen Krankenhäusern und Pflegeheimen: Mangelernährung…
Baxter: Parenterale Ernährung von Patienten mit hohem Aminosäurenbedarf

ONKOLOGIE

Darolutamid bei Prostatakarzinom: Hinweis auf beträchtlichen Zusatznutzen
Multiples Myelom: Wissenschaftler überprüfen den Stellenwert der Blutstammzelltransplantation
Neues zur onkologischen Supportiv- und Misteltherapie und aktuelle Kongress-Highlights zum…
Finanzierung der ambulanten Krebsberatung weiterhin nicht gesichert
Lungenkrebsscreening mittels Low-Dose-CT

MULTIPLE SKLEROSE

Geschützt: Multiple Sklerose: Novartis’ Siponimod verzögert Krankheitsprogression und Hirnatrophie bei…
Neurofilamente als Diagnose- und Prognosemarker für Multiple Sklerose
Bedeutung der Langzeittherapie bei Multipler Sklerose – mehr Sicherheit und…
Bristol Myers Squibb erhält Zulassung der Europäischen Kommission für Ozanimod…
Einige MS-Medikamente könnten vor SARS-CoV-2/COVID-19 schützen

PARKINSON

Neue Studie zur tiefen Hirnstimulation bei Parkinson-Erkrankung als Meilenstein der…
Putzfimmel im Gehirn
Parkinson-Patienten in der Coronakrise: Versorgungssituation und ein neuer Ratgeber
Neuer Test: Frühzeitige Differenzialdiagose der Parkinson-Erkrankung
Gegen das Zittern: Parkinson- und essentiellen Tremor mit Ultraschall behandeln…