Many Alzheimer’s patients get drugs with opposing effects

But no higher risk of death or nursing home entry with choline drug conflict

 

Seattle, WA, USA (October 25, 2011) You wouldn’t brake your car while stepping on the gas—or wash down a sleeping pill with espresso. Yet many people taking common Alzheimer’s disease medications—cholinesterase inhibitors—are given medications with anticholinergic properties, which oppose their effects. Group Health Research Institute scientists investigated how often that happens and reported on the consequences in an “Early View” study e-published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

 

“Cholinesterase inhibitors are today’s primary therapy for slowing Alzheimer’s disease,” said study leader Denise Boudreau, PhD, RPh, an associate scientific investigator at Group Health Research Institute. “Anticholinergic properties are often found in drugs commonly used to treat gastrointestinal disorders, allergies, urinary incontinence, depression, and Parkinson’s disease, and they can have negative effects on cognition and function in the elderly. There’s concern that if someone is taking both types of drugs—cholinesterase inhibitors and anticholinergic medications—they will antagonize each other, and neither will work.”

 

In clinical trials, cholinesterase inhibitors show modest effects against the functional and cognitive decline of people with Alzheimer’s disease. These medications, such as donepezil (Aricept) work by inhibiting the breakdown of acetylcholine, which sends signals in the nervous system. By contrast, anticholinergics—such as diphenhydramine (Benadryl) and oxybutynin (Ditopan)—block the action of acetylcholine. Since the two types of drugs have opposite effects, it makes sense not to give both kinds of drugs to an individual person. But until Dr. Boudreau’s study, few researchers had explored how often patients are prescribed both types of medications and which harms this might cause.

 

Dr. Boudreau and colleagues conducted a retrospective cohort study of 5,625 people aged 50 or older who received a new prescription for cholinesterase inhibitors between 2000 and 2007. The researchers used electronic pharmacy records of Group Health Cooperative and Kaiser Permanente Colorado, nonprofit health care systems that together provide care to more than a million people. The research team found patients who also had a prescription for anticholinergics from the year before their cholinesterase prescription until the analysis ended on December 31, 2008, or the patient left the health care system or died. The study was the first to use state death records and insurance claims for nursing home care to look for effects of taking both drug types.

 

The researchers found:

 

Of the cholinesterase inhibitor users, 37 percent were also taking at least one anticholinergic drug, and more than 11 percent took two or more. This was similar to other studies of Medicare beneficiaries.

For those using both medication types, dual use generally lasted three to four months, but 25 percent used both classes of drugs for more than a year.

Anticholinergics were already being used in 23 percent of people receiving a new cholinesterase inhibitor prescription, and 77 percent continued, even after starting the cholinesterase inhibitor.

Subjects using both medication types were not more likely to enter a nursing home or to die than those taking only cholinesterase inhibitors.

 

“It’s reassuring that we did not observe an association between simultaneous use of the two types of drugs and increased risk of death or nursing home placement,” said Dr. Boudreau. “But concomitant use of these drugs is, at the very least, not optimal clinical practice.” Preventing concurrent use of opposing drugs could also be a chance to reduce waste in health care spending, since a month of donepezil treatment costs approximately $180.

 

One reason that health care providers might prescribe conflicting medications is that dementia patients often have multiple medical conditions. Also, anticholinergics are often given to counteract the side effects of cholinesterase inhibitors, which are one of the few available treatments for people with Alzheimer’s. Dr. Boudreau hopes the study raises awareness about the potential inappropriateness of prescribing both types of drugs—and stimulate discussions about the best way to make therapeutic decisions for people with Alzheimer’s.

 

“Providers, families, and patients should carefully consider the extent to which demonstrated benefits or harms in an individual patient justify long-term use of these drugs,” said Dr. Boudreau. “A good first step is to have clearly agreed-upon goals for therapy and a plan to monitor for effects and side effects.” Now Group Health Research Institute scientists have started to work with Group Health Cooperative on steps like these to improve the quality of care.

 

A contract with the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute supported this research.

 

 

Study link

 

 

 

Dr. Boudreau’s co-authors are Senior Biostatistician Onchee Yu, MS, Group Health Vice President for Research and Executive Director Eric B. Larson, MD, MPH, and Jeanene Johnson, MPH, of Group Health Research Institute, in Seattle; Shelly L. Gray, PharmD, MS, of the University of Washington; and Marsha A. Raebel, PharmD, of the Kaiser Permanente Colorado Institute for Health Research and the University of Colorado at Denver. Drs. Boudreau and Larson are also affiliated with the University of Washington.

 

 

The Journal of the American Geriatrics Society

The Journal of the American Geriatrics Society is a comprehensive and reliable source of monthly research and information about common diseases and disorders of older adults.

 

 

Group Health Research Institute

Group Health Research Institute is the research arm of Seattle-based Group Health Cooperative, a consumer-governed, nonprofit health care system. Founded in 1947, Group Health Cooperative coordinates health care and coverage. Group Health Research Institute changed its name from Group Health Center for Health Studies in 2009. Since 1983, the Institute has conducted nonproprietary public-interest research on preventing, diagnosing, and treating major health problems. Government and private research grants provide its main funding

 

 


Group Health Research Institute, 25.10.2011 (tB).

MEDICAL NEWS

Fitness watches generate useful information, but increase patient anxiety
A new device provides added protection against COVID-19 during endoscopic…
81 million Americans lacking space or bathrooms to follow COVID…
Front-line physicians stressed and anxious at work and home
EULAR: High-Dose Glucocorticoids and IL-6 Receptor inhibition can reduce COVID-19…

SCHMERZ PAINCARE

Morbus Fabry mittels Datenanalysen aus dem PraxisRegister Schmerz aufspüren
Neandertaler besaßen niedrigere Schmerzschwelle
Deutscher Schmerz- und Palliativtag 2020 – ONLINE
Deutsche Gesellschaft für Schmerzmedizin fordert Anerkennung von Nicht-Psychologen in der…
DBfK: Besondere Rolle für Pflegeexpert/innen Schmerz – nicht nur in…

DIABETES

“Körperstolz”: Michael Krauser managt seinen Diabetes digital
Der richtige Sensor – von Anfang an
Diabetes mellitus: Ein Risikofaktor für frühe Darmkrebserkrankungen
Fastenmonat Ramadan: Alte und neue Herausforderung für chronisch Erkrankte während…
Sanofi setzt sich für die Bedürfnisse von Menschen mit Diabetes…

ERNÄHRUNG

Corona-Erkrankung: Fehl- und Mangelernährung sind unterschätze Risikofaktoren
Gesundheitliche Auswirkungen des Salzkonsums bleiben unklar: Weder der Nutzen noch…
Fast Food, Bio-Lebensmittel, Energydrinks: neue Daten zum Ernährungsverhalten in Deutschland
Neue Daten zur Ernährungssituation in deutschen Krankenhäusern und Pflegeheimen: Mangelernährung…
Baxter: Parenterale Ernährung von Patienten mit hohem Aminosäurenbedarf

ONKOLOGIE

Darolutamid bei Prostatakarzinom: Hinweis auf beträchtlichen Zusatznutzen
Multiples Myelom: Wissenschaftler überprüfen den Stellenwert der Blutstammzelltransplantation
Neues zur onkologischen Supportiv- und Misteltherapie und aktuelle Kongress-Highlights zum…
Finanzierung der ambulanten Krebsberatung weiterhin nicht gesichert
Lungenkrebsscreening mittels Low-Dose-CT

MULTIPLE SKLEROSE

Geschützt: Multiple Sklerose: Novartis’ Siponimod verzögert Krankheitsprogression und Hirnatrophie bei…
Neurofilamente als Diagnose- und Prognosemarker für Multiple Sklerose
Bedeutung der Langzeittherapie bei Multipler Sklerose – mehr Sicherheit und…
Bristol Myers Squibb erhält Zulassung der Europäischen Kommission für Ozanimod…
Einige MS-Medikamente könnten vor SARS-CoV-2/COVID-19 schützen

PARKINSON

Neue Studie zur tiefen Hirnstimulation bei Parkinson-Erkrankung als Meilenstein der…
Putzfimmel im Gehirn
Parkinson-Patienten in der Coronakrise: Versorgungssituation und ein neuer Ratgeber
Neuer Test: Frühzeitige Differenzialdiagose der Parkinson-Erkrankung
Gegen das Zittern: Parkinson- und essentiellen Tremor mit Ultraschall behandeln…