High speed air hand dryers spread contamination more than paper towels

  • Experiment shows air dryers spread bacteria from poorly washed hands to clothing and surfaces beyond the restroom

 

NEW YORK, USA (March 17, 2021) — High speed air dryers not only leave more contamination on poorly washed hands compared to paper towels, but during hand drying, they can also spread germs onto clothing, ultimately transferring more bacteria to other surfaces, according to a study published today in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America.

Past research has shown recommended handwashing practices for healthcare workers are often not followed with average adherence of 40%. To better understand the impact of hand drying in hand hygiene, researchers conducted an experiment to learn the role of different hand drying methods in spreading germs from poorly washed hands beyond the restroom.

For the study, volunteers sanitized their hands with 70% alcohol disinfectant, dipped them in a nonharmful viral solution, shook them off, and then dried them either using an air dryer or paper towels. During experiment, volunteers wore an apron to test contamination of clothing. Volunteers then took a predetermined path through the hospital touching commonly used surfaces, such as elevator buttons, along the way. Samples were collected from surfaces that volunteers touched and also from the aprons.

“Based on the user and surface contamination observed following hand drying using high speed air dryers, we question the choice of air dryers in healthcare settings,” said Ines Moura, PhD, research fellow, University of Leeds and an author on the study. “Microbes remaining after hand drying can transfer to surfaces via contaminated hands and clothing.”

On average, the levels of contamination to surfaces volunteers touched with their hands were 10 times higher after hands were dried with an air dryer than with paper towels. Researchers also saw greater microbial transfer to the apron when volunteers used the air dryer. The transfer of microbes to volunteers’ clothing after using the air dryer also contributed to the spread of germs.

“The study was performed in a healthcare setting and has important lessons for health institutions that still have high speed air dryers in restrooms, but the results are also relevant for public restrooms with high foot traffic,” Moura said.

 

 

 

  • Ines Moura, Duncan Ewin, Mark Wilcox. “From the hospital toilet to the ward: a pilot study on microbe dispersal to multiple hospital surfaces following hand drying using a jet air dryer versus paper towels.” Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology. Web (March 17, 2021).

 

About ICHE

Published through a partnership between the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America and Cambridge University Press, Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology provides original, peer reviewed scientific articles for anyone involved with an infection control or epidemiology program in a hospital or healthcare facility. ICHE is ranked 41st out of 89 Infectious Disease Journals in the latest Web of Knowledge Journal Citation Reports from Thomson Reuters.

The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA) is a professional society representing more than 2,000 physicians and other healthcare professionals around the world who possess expertise and passion for healthcare epidemiology, infection prevention, and antimicrobial stewardship. The society’s work improves public health by establishing infection-prevention measures and supporting antibiotic stewardship among healthcare providers, hospitals, and health systems. This is accomplished by leading research studies, translating research into clinical practice, developing evidence-based policies, optimizing antibiotic stewardship, and advancing the field of healthcare epidemiology. SHEA and its members strive to improve patient outcomes and create a safer, healthier future for all. Visit SHEA online at http://www.shea-online.org, http://www.facebook.com/SHEApreventingHAIs and twitter.com/SHEA_Epi.

 

About Cambridge University Press

Cambridge University Press is part of the University of Cambridge. It furthers the University’s mission by disseminating knowledge in the pursuit of education, learning and research at the highest international levels of excellence. Its extensive peer-reviewed publishing lists comprise 45,000 titles covering academic research, professional development, over 400 research journals, school-level education, English language teaching and bible publishing. Playing a leading role in today’s international market place, Cambridge University Press has over 50 offices around the globe, and it distributes its products to nearly every country in the world.

For further information about Cambridge University Press, visit Cambridge.org.

 

 


Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America, 17.03.2021 (tB).

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